Friday, October 30, 2009
Everyone Hates Their Job Sometimes...

Here's the truth. Sometimes I hate writing this fucking book.

I know this isn't something most of you want to hear. You want to hear that it's going well. (Which is it.) You also want to hear that I love every moment of writing it. It's my baby, right? You have to love your baby...

Well, yes. But technically I've been working on this trilogy since 1994. The book is more like a teenager in some ways. You love a teenager too, but you can also be angry with a teenager. And sick of its endless shit.

The problem is this. People want to believe that being a published writer is a beautiful, happily-ever-after, candy mountain place where all your dreams come true.

Unfortunately, that's bullshit.

This is a part of something I've come to think of as The Myth of the Author. I'm not going to get into the details right now. That's a blog for a whole different day. But the gist of my theory is that, in general, people think of writers as a different sort of person. And by extension, writing is a different sort of work. It's strange and wonderful. It's a mystic process. It can't be quantified. It's not chemistry, it's alchemy.

While some of that is true, this belief makes it really difficult for me to bitch about my job.

For example, if a doctor wrote a blog saying. "Fuck! sometimes I hate being a doctor…" People would read it and say, "Yeah man. I can see where you're coming from. Long hours. Tons of responsibility. People expect a lot out of you. That's a rough gig."

On the other hand, if I come on here and bitch about my job. People will be disappointed. Irritated even.

Why would people be irritated? For several reasons.

Reason #1: It's irritating when people complain about having a simple job.



Of course, writing a novel isn't simple. Anyone that's ever tried writing one knows this. The problem is, a lot of people haven't tried. They assume writing is easy because, technically, anyone can do it.

To illustrate my point: Just as I was getting published, I met one of the big, A-list fantasy authors. (Who will remain nameless here.)

He told me the story of the time he'd met a doctor at a party. When the author mentioned that he wrote for a living, the doctor said: "Yeah, I was going to write a novel. But I just don't seem to have the time."

The author got a irritated just telling me this story. "When you say something like that," he said. "It's like saying being a writer doesn't take any skill. It's something anyone can do. But only a very slim percentage of the population can write well enough to make a living at it. It's like going up to a doctor and saying, 'yeah. My appendix was inflamed. I was going to take it out myself, but I didn't really have the time.'"

Newbie writer that I was, I simply enjoyed the story, privately thinking that surely *my* readers would never be so foolish to assume that. And even if they did, I wouldn't mind that much…

Fast forward to earlier this year, when I got the following e-mail:

Hi Patrick,

I'm a librarian, former teacher. I just read your book, very good. But, boy do you have a problem. Finishing tasks?? Why isn't your editor doing a better job of guiding you? Here's my quick recommendation: stop going to conventions. Your first book is a great hit, you don't need any more marketing there. Sit down and decide where to END the second part. You don't need to write any more. If book two is anything like book one, it is basically chronological. You're done with book two!! Stop in a logical place, smooth out the transitions, and begin obsessing about book three. Good luck.

For those of you who have been reading the blog for a while, this is the letter I was thinking about mocking Waaaay back in May.

Re-reading it now, most of my irritation has faded. But my profound sensation of *What the Fuck* is still as strong as ever.

Let's not even deal with the first half of the letter. Let's ignore the fact that this woman isn't a publicist, an editor, or my personal life-coach. Let's jump straight to how she explains how I should write my book:

Oh. I need to sit down. I see. I need to know where to END it. I hadn't thought of that.

And chronological order? Brilliant! Up until this point I'd been arranging all the chapters by length.

I mean seriously. You people do know that I have to make the entire book up, right? I'm not just cribbing it out of Kvothe's biography, right?

Right?

And I lack the words to express my stupification at the offhand advice that I should just "smooth out the transitions."

That's not true. I do have the words. They go like this: "If this is the sort of advice you used to give your students when you were a teacher, thank you for not being a teacher any more."

I counted yesterday. Do you know book two has eighteen fucking plotlines? Six entirely distinct settings, each with their own casts of characters? How exactly to I smooth that out? Do you think I just go down to the writing store, buy some fucking transition putty, and slather it on?

Okay. I lied. I guess I'm still irritated.

Truth is, I know that this letter comes from a place of love. This person is genuinely trying to help me. Deep in her heart of hearts, this woman believes she knows how to write a novel. The answers are so obvious. It seems simple to her…

This is why some folks will get irritated if I complain about my job. Because they think writing is simple.

But it isn't. Nobody's job is as simple as it looks from the outside.


Reason #2: It's not cool to complain about your dream job.

I'm well aware of the fact that, I'm living the dream. A lot of people want to be published. They want it so bad they can taste it. They'd give anything…

I know this because that's how I used to feel.

I'm lucky: I got published. What's more, I'm one of the few writers that gets to write full time. Even better, I've gone international, and people all over the world are waiting for the next book.

But that doesn't mean I don't hate my job sometimes.

It doesn't matter what you do for a living. Ron Jeremy probably calls in sick some days because he just can't stand the thought of getting another blowjob. I don't doubt that Mike and Jerry over at Penny Arcade occasionally wake up in the morning and think, "Fuck, I've got to play more fucking video games today."

That's just the way of the world. Everyone hates their own job sometimes. It's an inalienable right, like life, liberty, and the pursuit of property.


Reason #3: The Myth of the Author.

People want to believe that the act of creation is a magical thing. When I write, I am like some beardy old-word god, hewing the book from some raw piece of literary firmament. When I write, the muse is like a lithe, naked woman, sitting on my lap with her tongue in my ear.



(This would make a great bookjacket photo.)


And you want to know the truth? Sometimes it's exactly like that. Sometimes when I write, I'm so full of adrenaline that I could lift up a truck. I can feel my my tripartite soul burning in my chest like molten gold.

But sometimes it sucks. Just like any job. I get bored revising the same chapters over and over. My back hurts from hunching over the keyboard. I am so tired of fucking spellcheck. Do you know how long it takes to run spellcheck on 350,000 words?

I'm tired of trying to juggle everything: the plotlines, the character arcs, the realistic depiction of a fantastic world, the pacing, the word choice, the tension, the tone, the stories-within-stories. Half of it would be easy, but getting everything right at once? It's like trying to play cat's cradle in n-dimensional space.

The truth is, sometimes I'm so sick of sitting in front of this computer I could shit bile.

There. That's all. I'm not quitting. I'm not even taking the night off. I just needed to vent.

Thanks for being here. Remember to tip your waitress. I'll be here all week.

pat

Labels: , , ,

posted by Pat at 287 Comments



Monday, October 26, 2009
Huzzah!

In some ways, I'm an optimist. This shouldn't come as much of a surprise, a person doesn't work on the same book for over a decade without a little glimmer of hope to keep them going.

But it's more than that, really. I believe that the vast majority of people are good. Not just deep-down good, but good right up on the surface. That's why I run these fundraisers. I think most people enjoy making the world a better place. All they need is an opportunity, and, occasionally, a little nudge.

But in other ways, I'm a pessimist. For example, I believe that most large corporate entities by their very nature tend to be malignant.

When I say malignant, I'm not saying that Global Corp is going to break into your house and kill you while you sleep. But they will make your pillow out of a fire-retardant chemical that makes you breathe toluene all night. Because they can be sued by a smoker who lights their own pillow on fire, but not by someone who gets cancer when they're sixty.

What's my point? Well, my point is that when my account got flagged by Paypal a couple of days ago, I really didn't have much hope of being able to straighten things out with them.

In fact, I was ready to be all indignant about it. I've had a Paypal account since 2001, and I felt a little betrayed. I had all sorts of scathing things I was going to say. Names I was going to call them. Mud I was going to fling. How dare they take a crap on my fundraiser? Especially when it was going so well...

Despite this pessimism, I e-mailed them to straighten things out. I tried to work within the system. I talked to them on the phone.

So imagine my surprise when they were really nice. And today, all the limitations were lifted from my Paypal account. I really wasn't expecting things to work out so quickly and easily.

The purpose of this blog is twofold.

First, I just wanted to say thanks to Paypal. You guys impressed me.

The second is to update everyone on the status of the name raffle fundraiser thing.

Things are going amazingly well. So far we've got about 150 people donating, and we've raised over 8000 dollars. Way better than I ever expected.

Because I'm drawing two winners, that means if you buy a ticket, you've got about a 1 in 400 chance of winning.

If you donate 50 bucks, which gets you 6 tickets, you've got about a 1 in 70 chance.

That beats the hell out of most lotteries, you have to admit. Besides, and all the money is going to a great cause.


(How can you not want be a part of this?)


I'm hoping we can finish strong on this. We lost a few days because of the Paypal thing, but if people help spread the word I think we can make up for it.

And one more time, here's the link to the blog with all the raffle details and the now-functional online donation buttons.

And lastly, if you're thinking of donating online. You might want to strike now while the iron is hot. A lot of Paypal's system is automated, and there's an outside chance it might flag my account again in a week or so. It would be shame if you missed your chance to donate because of that...


Frabjously yours,

pat

Labels: ,

posted by Pat at 45 Comments



Friday, October 23, 2009
Sfsignal - What book Introduced you to Fantasy?

Recently, SFsignal asked a bunch of authors about how they got introduced to fantasy. (Myself included.)

It was interesting to see what the other authors listed. Some mentioned old familiars, and I picked up a few new titles for me increasingly long "To Be read" list.

It's an interesting collective interview. If you want to check it out, it's over here.

Edit: A helpful fan found a link to the read-along record I talk about in the interview. It's over here.

As for the raffle, there's good news and bad news.

The good news is that things are going really well. We've already raised over 6000 dollars. Woo!

The bad news is that paypal doesn't like me using my account for anything resembling gambling. I've sent them an e-mail to hopefully straighten things out, and make it clear that this is really just a charity fundraiser with an incentive that just *looks* like a raffle.

I'm waiting to hear back from them. But the moral of the story is that if you want to donate online with paypal, it might be better to do it sooner, rather than later. I might be forced to take the paypal link down, and if that happens, I'll have to muddle my way through figuring out google checkout or some shit like that. And if it's close to November 15th (the end of the name fundraiser) I might not bother.

Or you can take the safe and simple route and just mail your entry in. Easy peasy.

If you don't know what I'm talking about, but you're interested in maybe getting your name in The Wise Man's Fear, you can get all the details over here.

More news soon.

pat

Labels: ,

posted by Pat at 58 Comments



Wednesday, October 14, 2009
So You Want to Be a Hero?

A while back, I said I'd be giving people a chance to get their names into my second book: The Wise Man's Fear.

I've finally managed to work out all the details. So we're going to do our best to kill two birds with one stone.

You want to get your name into book two....





...and I want to raise money for Heifer International.





So, as a prologue to this year's fundraiser, we're going to have a raffle.

There are three ways you can get your name into the book. Pay attention.


Option One: The Regular Raffle.

You buy chances to win, like raffle tickets. Tickets will be 10 dollars each.

That means if you donate 30 dollars, your name gets thrown into the drawing three times. Simple.

However, if you want to be a big spender and donate fifty dollars, you get a free ticket. So fifty bucks gets you six tickets total.

At the end of the lottery, I'll be drawing a winner from these tickets. If you don't win, your ticket will enter a second drawing combined with the free entries. (See below.) What this means is that every ticket you buy gets two chances to win.


You have two ways to buy tickets:
  • To Buy Your Tickets by Mail:
You only need two things.

A check, made out to Pat Rothfuss. Signed by you.

A 3x5 index card that looks like this:




(Click to Embiggen)


Remember folks, I have to read these. That means you should probably print instead of using cursive. It doesn't need to be pretty, just legible.

And you see what I did up there? Where I wrote an "a" then wrote over it and made it a "u?" That's not very clear, is it? I should have used some white out, or done something else rather than leave it ambiguous. That would have been the smart thing to do...

Lastly, mail the check and the card to:

Pat Rothfuss
PO Box 186
Stevens Point, WI 54481

  • To Buy Your Tickets Online:
[EDIT: Woo Hoo! After a relatively painless review process, the online option is back! Thanks for being cool about this, Paypal!]

Because international post is slow and expensive, I decided to make a paypal option available. (You can use the three custom buttons below to donate.)

Note – Tickets through paypal will actually be $11 each. This is because paypal takes a percentage of all the money it helps transfer. And, to be completely honest, because it's going to be a bit of a pain for me to sift all these digital entries onto paper tickets.






(Click the picture to be cool and donate 11 bucks.)


However, if you donate an even 50 bucks through paypal, I'll cover the extra fees myself, and you can still have six tickets.






(Click to be awesome and donate 50 bucks.)


If you're feeling extraordinarily extravagant, you can donate as much as you like with this button. (Keeping in mind that it should probably be some multiple of 11 or 50.)






(Click to be a rockstar and donate according to your desire.)


Remember: when you submit your paypal order, you need to include all the information you would have written on the note card.

DO THIS BEFORE YOU COMPLETE YOUR DONATION! After you donate, there's no way to go back and add this information.


Your phone number.
Your name.
Your e-mail.
The name you're hoping to get into the book.


Option Two: The Poor-Boy Raffle.

I spent nine years as an undergrad, so I know what it's like to not have a lot of folding money. This is the option that will give everyone a chance to throw their hat into the ring, even if they can't afford ten dollars for a ticket.

To get into the free option, you just mail a 3x5 note card, filled out just like the one above.

To this address:

Pat Rothfuss
PO BOX 186
Stevens Point, WI 54481

And that's it.

After I draw the winner from the paying option, I'm going to take all the non-winning tickets from that raffle, combine them with the free entries, and draw a second winner.

Important: If you buy a ticket, I will automatically enter you in the poor-man's raffle.

That means if you buy a ticket, DON'T don't send in an entry for the poor man's raffle too. This will only waste your time and anger me.



Option Three: The Cool Name Option

If I look through the entries and see a suggested name that looks cool to me, I might tweak it a bit and use it in the book.

Simple as that. I'm always on the lookout for cool names.


FAQ:

When is the raffle over?

One month from now: November 15th.


What are the odds of my winning the raffle?

Just like all raffles, that depends on how many tickets you buy, and how many people enter. But it should be obvious that you're (roughly) twice as likely to win than if you use the free option.

Edit: As of October 27th, we had raised a little more than 8000 dollars.

That means if you buy a ticket, your odds of winning are roughly 1 in 400. (Because I'm drawing two winners.)

Or, if you donate fifty bucks and get six tickets, your odds are about 1 in 70.

Those are pretty good odds.

Also, if we get a bunch more people participating. I'll draw an extra winner from the group that paid for their tickets.

That means it won't hurt your odds to spread the word to your friends. More participants will actually lead to more chances to win.


Can I use my own name as the one I want in the book?

Of course. I'm guessing this is what most people want. I'm just leaving the door open for people to suggest other options.

If I buy more than one ticket, should I send in more than one card?

No. There's never any reason to send in/fill out more than one card.

Does this mean book two isn't finished yet?

*sigh* Yes. That should be pretty obvious. I couldn't add things if it was finished. The revision process for a book this big takes a long time, and I'm still fixing things. Adding more awesome. Taking out things that aren't quite awesome enough. Making sure everyone's eyes are the right colour. That sort of stuff.

So if I win, I get to put whatever name I want in your upcoming book?

No. What will happen is the two of us will have a talk about how your name, or a variation of it, will fit into my book. Something that will make us both happy.

Read this blog for details and reasons why.

Will I get any control over who I am in the book? Will the character with my name look like me?

This will be part of our negotiation. If you really want to be a student at the University, and your name will work for that, we can make that happen. I might be able to tweak their appearance a little so it's closer to yours, too.

The short answer is that I'll do what I can to make you happy. But the book comes first, and I'm the final arbiter of what goes in and what doesn't.

Will you be doing this again for book three?

I don't know. A lot of that depends on how well this raffle works. If people are excited and we raise a lot of money, then I'll probably do it for book three.

On the other hand, if the response is small, and the whole thing ends up being a pain in my ass, there's a real possibility I won't do it again.

So all of the money you raise from this is going to charity?

Yes. All this money will be going to Heifer International. This raffle is actually just a warm-up to the bigger fundraiser that I'll be running on the blog next month.

If you're curious, you can look at last year's fundraiser HERE.


What's to keep people from swamping the free option with multiple entries?

There are several things that I think will keep this from being a severe problem.

1) Human Decency.

My readers are generous, kind human beings. Only a rapacious fuckwit would try to game the system on a charity raffle.

2) Human Laziness.

There's no online option for the free drawing. I doubt very much people will be filling out dozens of note cards by hand and sending them all in.

3) The name and phone number required with each entry.

I'm using phone numbers to catalog and organize the entries. That means I'm just going to throw away multiple free entries that have the same phone number, or those with no phone number at all. It's the classic "one entry per household." Except in this case it's not a house, it's a phone.

And yes, I know it's not a perfect system. But it's the best we can have without going to ridiculous lengths.

Are these prices in American dollars?

Yes. Foreign payments are one of the mail reasons I'm including a paypal option. Paypal will convert from your currency to US dollars.

If, for some strange reason, you want to send me a foreign check you need to do the following.

1. Figure out how much you want to donate.
(Let's say you live in London and want to donate 50 dollars.)

2. Add three dollars. Because that's how much my bank charges me to cash a foreign check.
(That makes your total 53 dollars.)

3. Convert this into your local currency.
(53 dollars = 32.96 British Pounds.)

4. Write your check out for this amount in your native currency. My bank can't cash it otherwise.
(So you write me a check for 33 pounds. Rounding up because you're a generous human being.)

Keep in mind that the raffle will be happening pretty soon after November 15th, and international post is slow. So if you're going to mail me a check, do it sooner rather than later.

I was really looking forward to this being an auction. I'm all full of money and was willing to pay whatever it takes to get my daughter's/husband's/dwarven monk's name in the book.

I'm willing to entertain the thought. If you really want an auction, let me know in the comments below and I'll think about setting one up, maybe in conjunction with the other auctions we're going to be running for the main fundraiser in a couple weeks.

More FAQ over here.


I'm excited, folks. Let's do this.

pat

Labels: , ,

posted by Pat at 132 Comments



Monday, October 12, 2009
Distracting Cuteness

I know I said I'd have the details about the name raffle up by Monday. But I didn't say *which* Monday, now did I? [Insert maniacal laughter here.]

Seriously though. I decided to add a paypal option for overseas people to use, and it's taking me a longer to figure out the details than I thought it would. Plus, I want the details of this particular blog to exceptionally clear and easy to understand. Otherwise I know there will be chaos and confusion.

Anyway. I'll have the kinks worked out of the blog by tomorrow (hopefully).

Until then, for those of you who have been asking, here's a picture of Oot.




(Click to embiggen)
(The picture, that is. Oot will remain regular baby size.)

Awwww. How cute is he? Plus his mouth is open, just like his daddy. In my experience, that means he's thinking about breasts, just like his daddy.

I wish I could take credit for that piece of dashing haberdashery, but I can't. The onesie he's wearing is a gift from a very thoughtful fan. Pure style.

Also, for those of you who keep asking. I think he's going to continue to be known as Oot here on the blog. Later on, if he wants, he can choose to be an internet rockstar. But for now, we'll let him keep a little anonymity. Literally.

Soon...

pat

Labels: ,

posted by Pat at 47 Comments



Saturday, October 10, 2009
Names Are Important Things...

So. A while back I mentioned I was going to be giving people the opportunity to get their name into book two.

Since then I've been putting a lot of thought into how I was going to accomplish this.

I considered an auction. I've seen that done a couple different ways by a couple different authors. It would be fairly simple, and it would be a good way to raise money for the upcoming Heifer fundraiser…. (Which is going to be even more awesome this year, by the way.)

However, something about the thought of an auction rubbed me the wrong way. It would be relatively easy to handle, and I'm all about raising money for Heifer. But still, it seemed odd for me to set up a system where the person with the most money automatically wins. That irks my egalitarian nature.

Plus, I had WAY too many imagined conversations along these lines:

Me: [on the phone] Congratulations! You won the auction!

Winner: Yay! I want to put my D&D character's name into the book!

Me: What's his name?

Winner: Studd Beefcake.

Me:

Winner: He's awesome. He's a dual class fighter/ranger. That means so long as he's only wearing leather armor…

Me: I don't think the name Studd Beefcake will fit smoothly into the world I've created.

Winner: How about my other character? Grignir Theqjirn'ateth.

Me: I beg your pardon? I think there was some static on the line…

Winner: Grignir Theqjirn'ateth. He's a dwarven monk.

Me: Do you…

Winner: Stunning Fist!

Me: Yes. Stunning Fist. Do you have any ideas for names that aren't your D&D characters?

Winner: Well… We could use my little boy's name…

Me: That sounds great. What is it?

Winner: Drizzt.

Me: I think there are copyright issues involved…

Winner: Drizzt Do'Urden RULES! Wooo!

Me: I don't think we can use Drizzt, either.

Winner: [Angrily] Why do you keep shooting down my awesome ideas? I paid, like, 4,000 dollars for this!

That's how all these conversations end in my mind. With the auction winner feeling that because they've shelled out a bunch of money, they have the right to stick whatever they want in my book.

But that's just not going to be the case. What will happen is you'll win a chance to propose a name for book two. If the name you're proposing sounds great to me, then huzzah. If not, the two of us will talk it over.

For example, maybe you want to get your girlfriend's name into the book because you're hoping it will get you that threeway you've always wanted. But her name is "Veronica" and that doesn't quite feel right for my world.

So we start talking it over. Maybe we can use her middle name instead. Maybe we use her nickname and I tweak the character's description a little bit so that it more closely resembles her. (Though I'll probably do this a little bit anyway.)

Maybe I put a little twist on the name. "Veronia" would be fine for the book.

Or maybe you decide you'd rather use your own name after all. And it turns out I'm fine with that because your name is Ferrel and that's exactly the sort of name that would fit on a Vintish Courtier, and I happen to be tweaking that section right now…

What I'm getting at here is that we'll negotiate until we're both happy with the addition to the book.

Anyway, the point is that I'll be running this like a lottery. That way we can raise money for Heifer, AND everyone has a chance to win.

In fact, everyone will have *several* chances to win.

In fact, even people that can't afford to buy their way in will have a chance to win.

Interested? Of course you are.

Tune in on Monday for the details.


Tantalizingly Yours,

pat

Labels: ,

posted by Pat at 65 Comments



Tuesday, October 6, 2009
A New Addition to the Family: Portugal

The Name of the Wind just came out in Portugal. They tell me that at the beginning of the month it was actually #7 on the bestseller lists over there. Which, I will admit, gives me a little bit of a tingle....

I haven't actually held one in my hands yet, but the cover looks pretty cool:





I always like seeing new covers for the book. Especially when the art has obviously been commissioned especially for the book.

Though I've only recently become a father, I've compared writing a book to having a baby for years. My mom used to refer to it as "her grandbook." And one of my friends used to ask about it in those terms. We wouldn't see each other for months, and when we got together and caught up on the news, she'd eventually ask, "And how's the baby doing...?"

Now that I've been a dad for a couple of weeks, I realize that the baby analogy is better than I thought. Before I was mostly referring to the emotional connection you feel to your own book. But now, having dealt with a newborn, I realize that writing a book is not entirely dissimilar to actually raising a child.

You feed it. Change it. Cuddle it. Dress it. Undress it. Change it. Feed it. Change it. Change it. Get it to take a nap. Change it.

And then, at the end of the day, you look at it and realize that it's pretty useless.

Don't get me wrong, you love it. You love it like nobody's business. But unless you're an idiot, you realize this thing really isn't good for anything yet. You're going to have months and months of thankless, repetitive work before it's capable of going out into the world on its own.

Later, when your book is published, it's very cool and very scary. That's when your baby has grown up enough to leave the nest. It's out there, meeting people all on its own. If you've raised it properly, it hopefully makes a good impression. Hopefully it makes friends.

But the foreign editions of the book are... different. It's still my baby, but it's not *really* my baby. It's like someone has cloned my baby and dressed it up in lederhosen and made it smoke a pipe for marketing reasons.

Yeah. The analogy really starts to fall apart after a while, I guess.

What was my point? No point. I don't always have to have a point, you know....

Wait! I guess I do have a point. It's that sometimes they make your baby smoke a pipe and you have to shrug it off. You don't know what sells books in Bangladesh, or Berlin, or Brigadoon. For the most part, you have to trust that the publisher knows what they're doing. For all you know, those Doonies are loonies for pipes...

But it's nice when you see the marketing and it appeals to your aesthetic. Like the trailer I posted before. Or this picture that I stumbled onto when I was googling up an image of the cover for this blog.




(Click to Embiggen)


I'm guessing this is a promotional poster. If it is, I wish I had a copy. I like the tagline across the top. "Kvothe: Magician, Musician, Thief, Assassin and... Hero."

Hell, if I'd have been able to come up with promo copy like that on my own, it wouldn't have taken me five years to sell the thing.

Later, you hoopy froods....

pat

Labels: , , ,

posted by Pat at 47 Comments



Saturday, October 3, 2009
Is Patrick Rothfuss Fashionable?

In my last post I said in an offhand way, "fashionistas among you will note my stylish geekware."

The joke, of course, lies in the fact that I am about as unfashionable as a person can be. I expect that the fashionistas pay as much attention to me as I pay to being fashionable. Which is to say, none. I am many things, but I am not one of the gliterati.

However, after that post, someone sent me a link to a blog that asked the question I thought nobody in their right mind would ever ask. Namely: Is Patrick Rothfuss Fashionable?

Share and enjoy,

pat

Labels: ,

posted by Pat at 29 Comments



RSS info

Archives
Previous Posts
Bookmark this Blog
(IE and Firefox users only - Safari users, click Command-D)


 


© 2007 Patrick Rothfuss, All Rights Reserved
Contact Patrick
website designed and hosted by
AuthorsOnTheWeb.com